People applying silica face masks at the Blue Lagoon

Frequently Asked Questions about the Blue Lagoon

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Iceland’s Blue Lagoon is the country’s most popular tourist attraction. Over a million people visit every year to dip into the blue thermal waters and relax their stress away.

However most first-time visitors have a lot of questions about this wonderful place. We’ve consolidated most of the common questions below. If you have a question not on the list, leave it in the comments below and we’ll be sure to answer it.

Also check out our Blue Lagoon Guide.

What is the Blue Lagoon?

Maybe you’ve seen pictures on social media, but this is a place that needs almost no introduction. The Blue Lagoon is a geothermal spa located amidst black lava rocks near the capital of Reykjavik.

Geothermal power plant with blue water
This famous spot was formed by nearby power plant

This is not natural, however, rather it is fed with the runoff from a geothermal power plant nearby. The original pools were an accident. What you’ll experience here now is a purpose-built spa and unlike anything else in the world. The spa complex now contains two hotels, multiple pools, saunas, restaurants, and even a private member’s only area.

Where is it Located?

This is located approximately 50 kilometers southwest of Reykjavik (a 45-minute drive) and approximately 21 kilometers south of the Keflavik International Airport (a 20-minute drive).

The official address is:
Norðurljósavegur 9, 240 Grindavík, Iceland
GPS Coordinates: 63.8804° N, 22.4495° W

How to Get to the Blue Lagoon

This famous spot is easy to reach from anywhere in the capital region. There are a number of different travel options to get here.

Driving

Diving yourself is the best option. This gives you the most flexibility and the most time there. If you have a rental car and are comfortable with Iceland’s roads (there are paved roads all the way to the spa), you can follow these directions from different locations.

From Reykjavik: Take Route 49 out of central Reykjavik east to Route 40 south. Continue on Route 41 heading West until you reach Route 43, also known as Grindavikurvegur. Follow this for about 5 minutes and turn right, following the signs to the spa. There is free parking for visitors to the spa.

From Keflavik International Airport: Follow Route 41 East straight out of the airport until you get to Route 43 – this will be the first main road you can turn off on. Take Route 43 for 5 minutes until you see the entrance on your right-hand side.

Guided Tours

If you don’t have a rental car, don’t fret. The vast majority of guided tours in the capital region often include a stop here. You can leave the driving to someone else and focus on enjoying the experience. On the downside, you’re restricted by the tour schedule so you don’t have as much flexibility.

Nearly all of the Golden Circle tours include a stop at the spa at the end of the day.

White bus in parking lot
The shuttle bus connects the airport, lagoon and Reykjavik

Airport Transfer or Reykjavik Shuttle?

The company offers airport layover options or direct excursions from Reykjavik. You can book a shuttle from Keflavik to the spa to Reykjavik or vice versa, or you can do round trips to either location.

Are Reservations Required?

In a word, absolutely. If you are hoping to enjoy a visit to these famous blue waters during your visit to Iceland, it is highly recommended that you make reservations as soon as possible. Tickets often book far in advance, so you’ll really want to make your Blue Lagoon reservations as far in advance as possible.

Walk-ins are possible on a space available basis. You’ll have better luck with this first thing in the morning or about two hours before closing. However, don’t leave your experience up to chance, make your reservations as soon as possible.

Is the Blue Lagoon Worth it or is it a Tourist Trap?

You may be concerned about the fact that this isn’t really a natural wonder or that it is the most visited paid attraction in Iceland. These are valid concerns, but it is up to you to decide if you want to experience it. While there will be large crowds, the site does an excellent job of managing bookings so that you won’t feel trapped or claustrophobic.

Crowd of people at a swim-up bar
There’s always a line at the swim-up bar

Even though the pool wasn’t naturally made, it is still very pretty and is surrounded by magnificent lava fields that make a perfect backdrop for any picture. Despite being a popular tourist attraction, we feel that a visit to the famous spa is definitely worth your time.

What Should I Bring with Me?

Here are the basic essentials that you will want for your visit:

  • Swimsuit
  • Toiletries including comb or brush, lotion, deodorant
  • Hair tie if you have long hair
  • Clean clothes for after your session
  • Sunscreen
  • Conditioner or swim cap to protect your hair
  • Sandals or water shoes
  • Waterproof bag for your items
  • Sunglasses

Can I Dry My Swimsuit at the Spa Before Flying Home?

This is a common concern among visitors, and unfortunately they do not offer suit dryers like many other pools.  The reason is that the silica can get stuck in the fabric.  If that happens, it is nearly impossible to get out.

Large number of robes on a rack
Robes are provided with most admission packages

However, they do provide complimentary plastic bags for your suit, so you can store it in those if you are worried about it passing moisture to your other luggage items. On warm, sunny days, you can sit outside after your sessions and allow your suit to air dry, especially if you have enough time to get food or drinks. You can also rinse your suit with cold water and then ring it out with your hands before placing it in the plastic bag.

Are Children Allowed?

All children are allowed, but only children 2 and older can enter the pool. Younger children have sensitivities to the minerals and other substances in the water, and it could cause irritation to their skin and eyes. They can, however, enter the facilities as long as they are supervised.

Children under 13 can enter the area for free, and children under 8 are required to wear arm floaties in the pool. This is a spa, not a swimming pool.  So rough play or throwing of balls/objects is not allowed.

How Long Does it Take to Visit?

You should give yourself at least two hours to visit, as there will be some time spent standing in line and preparing yourself for entry. If you are planning on dining at the restaurant, you should allot more time – something closer to three or four hours.

There is no harm in staying in the water longer than the recommended two hours, but most people feel as though they have had enough by that time. It is up to you how you want to portion your time between bathing, taking advantage of spa services, and eating.

Is it Open Year Round?

Yes, the spa complex is open all year long. You’ll find it is busier at peak times of the year (summer and around Christmas), but in the off-season, there are fewer visitors.

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